EKG

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_empty_space][rounding_section_head sec_head_text_align=”text-center” section_title=”EKG”][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]Alternative Names: Electrocardiogram; EKG; ECG

An electrocardiogram (ECG) is a test that records the electrical activity of the heart.
An ECG is used to measure the rate and regularity of heartbeats as well as the size and position of the chambers, the presence of any damage to the heart, and the effects of drugs or devices used to regulate the heart.


How the test is performed?

You are asked to lie down, and electrodes are affixed to each arm and leg and to your chest. This requires cleaning the site and, if necessary, shaving or clipping hair. The standard number of leads attached is 12 to 15 for a diagnostic ECG but may be as few as 3 to 5 for a monitoring procedure.
You are usually required to remain still, and you may be asked to hold your breath for short periods during the procedure. Sometimes this test is performed while you are exercising or under minimal stress to monitor changes in the heart. This type of ECG is often called a stress test.
The results are recorded on graph paper.


Why is an ECG performed?

An ECG is very useful in determining whether a person has heart disease. If a person has chest pain or palpitations, an ECG is helpful in determining if the heart is beating normally. If a person is on medications that may affect the heart or if the patient is on a pacemaker, an ECG can readily determine the immediate effects of changes in activity or medication levels. There are many factors that can affect the functioning of the heart and this is one step in evaluating possible cardiac symptoms.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]